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Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

 
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:06 pm    Post subject: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause
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talisker25
Keeper of the Quaich
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Joined: 01 Jun 2005
Posts: 1991
Location: north east

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause


i would give just about anything for a job like that....well done :D :D
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i've been on a whisky diet, i've lost 3 days already

The trouble with jogging is that ice falls out of your glass

http://talikerstantrums.blogspot.com/
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Geoff
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Posts: 39

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

talisker25 wrote:
Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause


i would give just about anything for a job like that....well done :D :D


Same here Laughing
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Wave
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Joined: 12 Nov 2005
Posts: 145
Location: O'er the big pond

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 5:58 am    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause



And you get paid for that??? I'd do it for free!!! Laughing Laughing Laughing
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talisker25
Keeper of the Quaich
Keeper of the Quaich


Joined: 01 Jun 2005
Posts: 1991
Location: north east

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 10:13 am    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Wave wrote:
Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause



And you get paid for that??? I'd do it for free!!! Laughing Laughing Laughing


or take payment in kind :D :D
_________________
i've been on a whisky diet, i've lost 3 days already

The trouble with jogging is that ice falls out of your glass

http://talikerstantrums.blogspot.com/
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Johnny
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Joined: 02 Apr 2005
Posts: 3553

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 11:40 am    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

talisker25 wrote:
Wave wrote:
Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause



And you get paid for that??? I'd do it for free!!! Laughing Laughing Laughing


or take payment in kind :D :D


Payment in kind please, and the honour of working there salute Laughing Laughing
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause


Whisky Girl, that will become confusing as we have one of those on here Laughing
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talisker25
Keeper of the Quaich
Keeper of the Quaich


Joined: 01 Jun 2005
Posts: 1991
Location: north east

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 2:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job Reply with quote

Judith wrote:
Johnny wrote:
Whisky girl's got the nose for a unique job

Jan 20 2006

Tryst Williams, Western Mail

THE long-lost art of the Welsh master distiller is set to be revived by a young chemistry graduate.

Gillian Howell, 25, who works at the Penderyn Whisky distillery in South Wales, home of Welsh Whisky, is on the way to becoming the nation's first master distiller for more than a century, as well as one of the only women in the business.

Gillian, originally from Fishguard and now living in Cardiff, explained how she got into a job that many would rank alongside chocolate taster and bed tester as their dream occupations.

"After finishing university and coming back from travelling around the world, I saw a job advertised for a trainee distiller and thought it sounded quite hilarious," she said.

"I had whisky at the interview - they forced me to try it! - and I joined the company on a 10-week contract."

Two years later and Miss Howell is involved in most aspects of the whisky-making process.

Her most important duties, though, involve checking the casks each month to check if the whisky is ready. Under the tutelage of Scottish whisky expert Dr Jim Swan, she does this by a combination of tasting and sniffing - hence the job's alternative title of "nose".

The commercial whisky-making tradition in Wales is believed to go back at least 300 years, although archeologists have found small stills dating back to the 4th century.

However, when Ffrongoch distillery, Bala, was closed down by the Temperance movement in 1899, it spelt the end of the nation's commercial whisky-making industry - and with it, the role of master distiller in Wales.

That all changed on March 1, 2004, with the launch of Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky, made near Hirwaun.

Miss Howell said her job never failed to provoke a reaction when it cropped up in conversation.

"People love it," she added, "I instantly make friends. The first question they ask is, 'Do you have any samples?' I'm often referred to as 'the whisky girl'."

http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Congratulations Gillian Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause


Whisky Girl, that will become confusing as we have one of those on here Laughing


no worries, when i have had too much to drink i always see double double Laughing Laughing
_________________
i've been on a whisky diet, i've lost 3 days already

The trouble with jogging is that ice falls out of your glass

http://talikerstantrums.blogspot.com/
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
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