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Sherry
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Old Faithful wrote:
Johnny wrote:
Old Faithful wrote:
You can't beat a nice Sherry trifle!!! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy


Apparently with really good sherry it should be drank like wine so only lasts hours or a couple of days so that is why sherry was used so much in cooking. The dark sweet sherries we buy in the UK are very different to those in Spain and these last a couple of months after being open.


I do tend to have the odd sherry or 2 around this time of the year!! But much prefer the darker ones!!! Very Happy Very Happy

Any idea which type is typically used for whisky barrels??? Confused

Quote:

The Macallan: a Vintage Scotch Whisky

by Charles Radlauer, M.D., J.D.

In a previous article several years ago, I touched upon the history of the production of Scotch whisky, and more specifically, the Macallan. To recap, in the early 1960’s, two events changed the course of Scotch whisky production. The first was a law in Spain requiring the bottling of sherry from Jerez de la Fontera to be done in Spain rather than England. Prior to that time, sherries had been shipped to Bristol and other English ports where they were bottled (remember Harvey’s Bristol Cream). The discarded sherry barrels were then bought by the frugal Scots and used to age their whiskey. Fortuitously at the same time, laws passed in the United States required that bourbon barrels be used only once and could not be reused for bourbon production. The Scots seized upon their good fortune and immediately began replacing their old sherry casks with the newly available bourbon ones. All Scottish whiskey producers except the Macallan, who purchased European barrels and paid the sherry producers to use their barrels, reclaiming the barrels for use in production of the Macallan after the sherry was bottled. The Sherry Oak is therefore distinctive among Scotch whisky for its softer, sweeter, more approachable flavor: the 18 Year Old no longer being allowed in single malt competitions because it always wins!



Dry oloroso casks, shipped unbroken from Spain.
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:48 am    Post subject: Tesco Cream Sherry Reply with quote

Quote:
Bodegas Real Tesoro was founded in 1897 as producers of fine quality Sherry and Brandy. In 1974, Don Jose Estevez purchased the company and in 1989 invested in a purpose built bodega, with the most modern wine making, bottling and laboratory facilities available, yet maintaining the traditional architecture of old 'Cathedral' style bodegas.

Winemaking details: After fermentation and fortification, the wine is poured into casks of oak for ageing. Oxidation takes place with the wine becoming dry on the palate and darkening in colour. The traditional method of ageing using 'Criaderas and Soleras' is also used. To give this wine its rich and sweet characteristics, a touch of Pedro Ximenez, a sherry made from raisined grapes is blended before bottling.


Price: £4.15

I went for the typical cream in an easy step into trying them all. Don Jose Estevez seems to be a good producer of sherries though so will leave notes when tried.
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SHERRY

Sherry's diverse styles make it suitable for a number of different occasions -- and sometimes challenging for even the most knowledgeable gourmet.

Even a lot of bartenders put it with the liqueurs, on the shelf above the cappuccino machine. Sherry is not a spirit. Sherry is a white wine. It needs to be kept chilled. And put it in a wine glass, not a cordial glass.

In a nutshell, sherry's lighter versions, fino and manzanilla, are aperitif wines or wines for light fish dishes, especially shellfish. Its medium-bodied versions, amontillado and palo cortado, go well with chicken, roasted pig, roasted veggies. Its fuller version, dry oloroso, is excellent with roasted red meats. Its dessert versions, sweet oloroso, moscatel and pedro ximinez, are some of the world's sweetest wines and can be served with chocolate cake or even poured over ice cream.

Sherry begins as a regular wine, made from southern Spain's acidic palomino fino grape. Then a natural film of yeast called flor (Spanish for flower) develops on it, protecting the aging wine from oxidization and creating its lighter styles. In other barrels, the formation of flor is revented, and these wines undergo the oxidization that creates fuller styles such as oloroso.

All sherries are fortified with grape brandy, from regular wine's 12 to 15 percent alcohol for lighter styles to 18 percent or more for the fullest styles.

All sherries age in a solera system, in tiers of barrels. Each year a percentage of sherry is drawn off from the oldest tier to sell, and sherry is drawn from younger barrels to refill the older ones. Thus every drop of sherry has at least a few molecules of wine from decades earlier, assuring consistency.

For the sweetest sherries, the super-sweet pedro ximinez grape is picked, allowed to dry almost to raisins in the sun, then added.

TYPES OF SHERRY

Fino -- Pale gold in color, this sherry is dry, light and suitable for pairing with tapas as well as light meats, cheese, and seafood.



Manzanilla-- Similar in style, color and food pairings to Fino, Manzanilla should be served chilled.

Cream-- Rich and sweet with a dark mahogany color, cream sherry is an ideal accompaniment to many desserts.

Oloroso -- Fragrant, full-boded and amber to mahogany in color, this sherry makes an excellent aperitif and is good served with game and red meats. Medium-sweet, it can also be served with dessert, nuts and fresh fruit.

Pale Cream -- Smooth-tasting and pale in color, this sweet sherry pairs well with foie gras and fruit salad.

Amontillado -- Amber-colored, dry and full-bodied, Amontillado is an ideal partner for heavier fish dishes, older cheeses and white meats.

http://www.thatsthespirit.com/en/wine/wine_sherry.asp
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aldis have a cream sherry and a Amontillado sherry for around £3.79 if anyone fancies treating themselves to something a little different this year. Very good prices for real sherry / Jerez rather than fortified British wine.
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talisker25
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:51 pm    Post subject: Pedro Ximinez Reply with quote

Not really a sherry love but......................have found a sheery that i realy like.
pedro ximinez, the 20 yo which is available in good independants,

prunes, raisins, old leather, silk in a glass. very moreish but you just canot drink to much, great with christmas pud and mince pies.

i bought mine in lewis and cooper in northallerton, north yorkshire.

£9.95 for 375cl

Beer Beer
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Johnny
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 4:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Pedro Ximinez Reply with quote

talisker25 wrote:
Not really a sherry love but......................have found a sheery that i realy like.
pedro ximinez, the 20 yo which is available in good independants,

prunes, raisins, old leather, silk in a glass. very moreish but you just canot drink to much, great with christmas pud and mince pies.

i bought mine in lewis and cooper in northallerton, north yorkshire.

£9.95 for 375cl

Beer Beer


Yes this is the very thick one which apparently in Spain they like to enjoy over ice-cream. One wine reviewer said he'd like to be offended but it tasted too good Very Happy
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Fernando77
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Sherry History 101 Reply with quote

Johnny wrote:
Quote:
When the Romans captured Spain, they found many vineyards and viticulture advanced rapidly. Then the Vandals invaded (calling the south Vandalusia) and in turn the Visigoths. It heralded a time of perpetual war until the Moors swept over the peninsular for some seven centuries, only to be usurped finally by the Christians. During Moorish domination, Jerez expanded in size and wealth. They called it "Seris", whích was later corrupted to "jerez" by the Spanish and to "sherry" by the English.

By the 16th century, the sherry trade with England had become well established, but it actually originated earlier during Moorish domination (despite the irony that wine was prohibited to the muslims.)

In recent times, wage inflation and the availability of cheaper and better machinery and new computer technology have jolted the traditions and whole atmosphere of the sherry towns. Equally the impact of individual businesses such as the fluctuating fortunes of Ruíz-Mateo has been enormous, from his family's humble beginnings as a local wine shipper to big business and banks. Nowadays all the big sherry labels of the world are present in some form in Jerez.


http://www.flamencoshop.com/sherry/sherry.htm


Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Beer Beer Beer

NICE! Laughing
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Pedro Ximinez Reply with quote

Johnny wrote:
talisker25 wrote:
Not really a sherry love but......................have found a sheery that i realy like.
pedro ximinez, the 20 yo which is available in good independants,

prunes, raisins, old leather, silk in a glass. very moreish but you just canot drink to much, great with christmas pud and mince pies.

i bought mine in lewis and cooper in northallerton, north yorkshire.

£9.95 for 375cl

Beer Beer


Yes this is the very thick one which apparently in Spain they like to enjoy over ice-cream. One wine reviewer said he'd like to be offended but it tasted too good Very Happy


I use to see drink "fino" mainly before lunch (we have our lunch at 2 or 3 pm); that moment we call it "aperitivo", time to have something spiritous to drink and something little to eat, so the "fino" marrys perfectly with tipical "tapas andaluzas". I have seen many many people during special holydays in places that hang a metalic cup of fino from a necklace to not forget it everywhere (they are so drunk, Laughing). These people end not worrying about what to eat with sherry...
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 8:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Pedro Ximinez Reply with quote

Fernando77 wrote:
Johnny wrote:
talisker25 wrote:
Not really a sherry love but......................have found a sheery that i realy like.
pedro ximinez, the 20 yo which is available in good independants,

prunes, raisins, old leather, silk in a glass. very moreish but you just canot drink to much, great with christmas pud and mince pies.

i bought mine in lewis and cooper in northallerton, north yorkshire.

£9.95 for 375cl

Beer Beer


Yes this is the very thick one which apparently in Spain they like to enjoy over ice-cream. One wine reviewer said he'd like to be offended but it tasted too good Very Happy


I use to see drink "fino" mainly before lunch (we have our lunch at 2 or 3 pm); that moment we call it "aperitivo", time to have something spiritous to drink and something little to eat, so the "fino" marrys perfectly with tipical "tapas andaluzas". I have seen many many people during special holydays in places that hang a metalic cup of fino from a necklace to not forget it everywhere (they are so drunk, Laughing). These people end not worrying about what to eat with sherry...


Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Where do I get the necklace from Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
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